Portals To The World

Doors come in all shapes, sizes, colours, construction and styles. They can be single or double doors; French or Dutch doors; louvered or flush doors. There are barn doors and saloon doors; wicker doors and sliding doors; hinged doors and swing doors. There are even False doors that lead nowhere and don’t even open!

But the one aspect that they all have in common: they are meant to keep something or someone in or out.

The earliest known records of doors are those represented in the paintings of the Egyptian tombs and they were either single or double doors, each constructed with a single piece of wood. Over the centuries, apart from the security needs, the door has been recognized as the first aspect of your building that a visitor will encounter and it will thereby contribute to that vital first impression. They are essentially Portals to the occupant’s life and lifestyle.

These are some of the world’s doors that I’ve passed through…

 

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Siem Reap. Cambodia. An open door policy.

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Siem Reap. Cambodia. So many doors that lead to nowhere.

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Hue. Viet Nam. More than just a portal. It’s an artist’s canvas.

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Tunis. Tunisia. When one door is closed, another opens.

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Mumbai. India. The gateway the British Raj passed through.

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St. Thomas. USVirgin Islands. People from all over the world pass through.

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Dominican Republic. The way to the Lord.

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Cop Denmark
Tivoli Gardens. A busy thoroughfare

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Delhi. India. Who knows what lurks behind a closed door?

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Rostock Germany
People with glass doors shouldn’t throw bricks

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Estonia. A door within a portal going who knows where?

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St. Petersberg. Russia. It only takes a small key to open a big door?

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Stockholm Sweden
Carve its name with pride

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Varanasi India
The gateway to the holy city should look good.

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Bangkok. Thailand. Heed the writing on the door?

The Hustlers

According to the International Labour Organization, in 2009 there were some 1.53 billion people in vulnerable employment either working for themselves or in badly paid family jobs. This represents about half the global workforce. This figure is expected to be significantly higher for 2011 and later years.

These are the people who struggle on the edge of survival and carry on regardless…

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Udaipur. India. Back breaking work.

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Mumbai. India. Dhobi Ghats. Not too much starch on the collar, please!

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Buenos Aires. Argentina. Where’s there smoke, there’s fire.

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Nassau. Bahamas. Someday I’ll be a tourist, too.

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Nassau. Bahamas. Counting the day’s take.

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Delhi. India. You have to put your back into it.

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Tallin. Estonia. A woman who finds pleasure in her work.

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Katmandu. Nepal. One man’s burden

The Working Class

These are the working class of the world—the people who perform in mostly labour intensive jobs, at low pay. They do work that is avoided by the middle and upper classes. Without them society would fall apart. And yet, these people labour on, day after day, year after year, never quite receiving the praise they deserve for their menial work.

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Vancouver. BC. Canada. Measure it twice. Cut it once.

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Sint Martin. Neth Antilles. Making a clean sweep of things

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Buenos Aries. Argentina. Some work. Others play.

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Henley. UK. Planning strategy

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Nassau. Bahamas. A painter artist at work.

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Copenhagen. Denmark. All in a day’s work.

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Delhi. India. The Lawn Ranger

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Delhi. India. That pollution can really get to you.

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Rostock. Germany. Keep it in ship shape.

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Tallinn. Estonia. Building it one brick at a time.

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Katmandu. Nepal. Everyone deserves a break.

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St. Petersberg. Russia. Two men aiming for higher things.

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Katmandu. Nepal. Counting the day’s take.

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Katmandu. Nepal. Some jobs are back breaking.

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Helsinki. Finland. Outdoor work is great only in summer.

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HoiAn Vietnam. Mirror mirror on the wall.

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Santiago. Chile. A man who can smile on the job.

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Varpraso. Chile. Waiting for their ship to come in.

 

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Buenos Aires. Argentina. A new coat for a new look

 

Children Of The World

Tomorrow’s citizens of the world. Innocent and still insulated from the ravages of time and the seven deadly sins, they will yet determine the future.

[NOTE: ALL PHOTOGRAPHS ARE COPYRIGHT © KEN PUDDICOMBE. WRITTEN PERMISSION REQUIRED FOR USE OF THESE IMAGES.]

 

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Agra. INDIA. The Age of Innocence.

 

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Native Village. PANAMA. “Look at me dad. I can balance.”

 

 

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Katmandu. NEPAL. Don’t Ask For Whom The Bell Tolls.

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Katmandu. NEPAL. “You can’t see it. But I take after my mum, who’s awesome.”

 

 

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Siem Reap. CAMBODIA. Taking the slow boat to somewhere.

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Ho Chi Minch City. VIETNAM. Dancing To a Different Beat.

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Katmandu. Nepal. “So, that’s how it’s done!”

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Varnasi. INDIA. “Can’t stop. Late for school.”

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DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. Sunshine on my shoulders.

Art and Artists At Work

As of 2011, there were approximately 4.4 million artists in the world, with a thin line drawn between those that can be classified as Professional and those who are Recreational artists. The amount spent on art-related materials and services is approximately $4B every year with a projected 4% growth annually.

Professional artists create, on the average, 75 works of art annually while Recreational artists do 36 pieces.

“Art will remain the most astonishing activity of mankind born out of struggle between wisdom and madness, between dream and reality in our mind.” ~Magdalena Abakanowicz

These are some of the artists and art that I’ve encountered in my travels

[NOTE: ALL PHOTOGRAPHS ARE COPYRIGHT © KEN PUDDICOMBE. WRITTEN PERMISSION REQUIRED FOR USE OF THESE IMAGES.]

FEEDBACK ALWAYS WELCOMED HERE

kenpudwriter@gmail.com

mip

Vancouver. BC Canada Waiting for inspiration

 

 

 

 

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St. Petersberg. RUSSIA. The Tsar lives on.

 

 


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Helsinki. FINLAND. A window to the world.

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Nassau. Bahamas. Art, one chip at a time.

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St.Petersberg. RUSSIA. Picasso Limbo?

 

 

 

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Santiago. CHILE. Art is what you see and what you make others see.

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Buenos Aires. ARGENTINA. Stepping up to do the hard work.

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Helsinki. FINLAND. Someone’s work cast in stone?

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St. Petersberg. RUSSIA. Picasso NOT for all ages?

 

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Sint Martin. Looking for someone inspiring.