WELLNESS

The current life expectancy [in Canada] is 82.2 years. By 2030 it’s estimated to rise another four years to 86.2. A recent news item suggested that future generations, with new medical technology and drugs combined, including lifestyle changes, would avoid a lot of the chronic conditions that currently carry us off, raising their life expectancy to 150!

IMG_2265

From my observations at the Wellness Centre, Millenials, are trying their best to extend their own life span. Most of us are retirees trying to push ourselves beyond our limitations. The approach of the average member: It’s never too late.

There are always new faces in the membership, people coming on board to join the multitude already working out. Then, there are the regulars, people who are dedicated and consistent. You can tell who they are. They’re always on schedule regardless of inclement weather, rain or sleet or a snow storm.

Continue reading

A Cineaste Remembers…

[Cineaste: noun. Cinema enthusiast or devotee.]


 

pexels-photo-208647.jpeg

The cinema played an important part in my youth, for so many reasons.

For someone growing up in the Fifties in Georgetown, in what was then British Guiana, it was the main form, perhaps the only form  of entertainment. It’s importance and impact on our culture and development cannot be overstated.

Here are some recollections of what it was like.

[Comments and similar recollections invited from readers for moderation. Subject to editing].

My memory goes back far enough that I recall the price of a ticket back in the Fifties. We were still on the Sterling currency in those days and a ticket to see a movie cost Half-a-bit, which would be four cents. A Bit was eight cents. A Bit-and-a-half was twelve cents. A shilling was the next denomination. These were all silver coins, minted obviously in the mother country—England. —Ken Puddicombe.

Continue reading

The Shoplifter

THE SHOPLIFTER

 

“I saw you,” the man shouted, and it seemed as if he didn’t care if the entire store or the whole world heard him. “You put the lipstick in your purse. I saw you.”
 “Not true,” the woman said.
She was blonde, perhaps forty, well dressed in a grey business suit, her five feet eight frame held erect, as if the man’s words were having no effect whatsoever on her.
“Yes,” he shouted again, “you did so, I saw you. And when you saw me, you put it back.”
“Not true,” she said, as the clerk placed her groceries in her recycled green bag.

Continue reading