Janet Naidu -Poet

Janet Naidu was born in Covent Garden, Guyana, a rural village close to the sugar plantations of Farm and Diamond.  Janet comes from humble beginnings—her father worked as a cane cutter and her mother sold greens in the village and in the market place.  She, along with her seven siblings assisted their parents in earning extra income.

Janet has made Canada her home since 1975. In 1973, two of her poems appeared in a small booklet called Heritage. After writing sporadically over the years, her first collection of poems, Winged Heart (1999) was short-listed for the Guyana Prize for Literature, poetry category.  Her other two collections include Rainwater (2005) and Sacred Silence (2009). Her poems capture themes of uprooted movements, nostalgic memories, resettlement, feminism, resilience and survival. Her writings also include essays of cultural and historical themes. Janet Naidu (4)
Her poetry and writings have appeared in news media, online publications, anthologies, referenced in books on Indo Caribbean themes and in the Women’s Journal of the University of the West Indies.

Janet obtained a BA from the University of Toronto and a Bachelor of Laws from the University of London, UK.


Janet, thanks for taking the time to do this interview for my readers. I’d like to focus on your collection Rainwater, in addition to your writing, in general.

Q. At what age did you start to write? What do you remember writing about? Does that writing still exist today?

A. As a teenager I sold greens in the village with my mother and had a notepad to write down credit given to the villagers. I used to also make little sketches and writings at the back pages when I waited for people to purchase items in our baskets. But most significantly, I started writing to pen pals around the world after posting my name and address in a pen pal magazine. I had pen pals from New Zealand, England, Germany, Japan, Pakistan, USA and many other countries. It was during this time, I entered into writing to pen pals around the world, telling them about my family life at home, and life in Guyana. I used to get creative, talking about simple things in the village, like when the sugar cane would burn and the cane dust would come through our windows. I made it sound exciting. Living in Canada, I am often taken back to that time when I was care free and thoughts of the natural world flowed so greater then. This reflection continues to influence my writing.

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Art and Artists At Work

As of 2011, there were approximately 4.4 million artists in the world, with a thin line drawn between those that can be classified as Professional and those who are Recreational artists. The amount spent on art-related materials and services is approximately $4B every year with a projected 4% growth annually.

Professional artists create, on the average, 75 works of art annually while Recreational artists do 36 pieces.

“Art will remain the most astonishing activity of mankind born out of struggle between wisdom and madness, between dream and reality in our mind.” ~Magdalena Abakanowicz

These are some of the artists and art that I’ve encountered in my travels

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Vancouver. BC Canada Waiting for inspiration

 

 

 

 

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St. Petersberg. RUSSIA. The Tsar lives on.

 

 


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Helsinki. FINLAND. A window to the world.

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Nassau. Bahamas. Art, one chip at a time.

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St.Petersberg. RUSSIA. Picasso Limbo?

 

 

 

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Santiago. CHILE. Art is what you see and what you make others see.

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Buenos Aires. ARGENTINA. Stepping up to do the hard work.

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Helsinki. FINLAND. Someone’s work cast in stone?

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St. Petersberg. RUSSIA. Picasso NOT for all ages?

 

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Sint Martin. Looking for someone inspiring.