The Working Class

These are the working class of the world—the people who perform in mostly labour intensive jobs, at low pay. They do work that is avoided by the middle and upper classes. Without them society would fall apart. And yet, these people labour on, day after day, year after year, never quite receiving the praise they deserve for their menial work.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Vancouver. BC. Canada. Measure it twice. Cut it once.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sint Martin. Neth Antilles. Making a clean sweep of things

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Buenos Aries. Argentina. Some work. Others play.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Henley. UK. Planning strategy

SA110292

Nassau. Bahamas. A painter artist at work.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Copenhagen. Denmark. All in a day’s work.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Delhi. India. The Lawn Ranger

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Delhi. India. That pollution can really get to you.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Rostock. Germany. Keep it in ship shape.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Tallinn. Estonia. Building it one brick at a time.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Katmandu. Nepal. Everyone deserves a break.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

St. Petersberg. Russia. Two men aiming for higher things.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Katmandu. Nepal. Counting the day’s take.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Katmandu. Nepal. Some jobs are back breaking.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Helsinki. Finland. Outdoor work is great only in summer.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

HoiAn Vietnam. Mirror mirror on the wall.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Santiago. Chile. A man who can smile on the job.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Varpraso. Chile. Waiting for their ship to come in.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Buenos Aires. Argentina. A new coat for a new look

 

Art and Artists At Work

As of 2011, there were approximately 4.4 million artists in the world, with a thin line drawn between those that can be classified as Professional and those who are Recreational artists. The amount spent on art-related materials and services is approximately $4B every year with a projected 4% growth annually.

Professional artists create, on the average, 75 works of art annually while Recreational artists do 36 pieces.

“Art will remain the most astonishing activity of mankind born out of struggle between wisdom and madness, between dream and reality in our mind.” ~Magdalena Abakanowicz

These are some of the artists and art that I’ve encountered in my travels

[NOTE: ALL PHOTOGRAPHS ARE COPYRIGHT © KEN PUDDICOMBE. WRITTEN PERMISSION REQUIRED FOR USE OF THESE IMAGES.]

FEEDBACK ALWAYS WELCOMED HERE

kenpudwriter@gmail.com

mip

Vancouver. BC Canada Waiting for inspiration

 

 

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

St. Petersberg. RUSSIA. The Tsar lives on.

 

 


OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Helsinki. FINLAND. A window to the world.

SA110285

Nassau. Bahamas. Art, one chip at a time.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

St.Petersberg. RUSSIA. Picasso Limbo?

 

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Santiago. CHILE. Art is what you see and what you make others see.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Buenos Aires. ARGENTINA. Stepping up to do the hard work.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Helsinki. FINLAND. Someone’s work cast in stone?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

St. Petersberg. RUSSIA. Picasso NOT for all ages?

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sint Martin. Looking for someone inspiring.

Chilean Fjords 25 November 2009

 

Leaving the small town of Chacabuco in Southern Chile, we travelled the Chilean Fjords, navigating through a myriad of small islands, most of them sparsely inhabited, all part of the remote Magallanes. Islands had names like Desolacion (Desolation) and Ultima Esperanza (last Hope) that surely reflected the way the earliest settlers, many of them European, must have felt. Narrow channels bracketed by towering mountains partly explained the calm waters and isolated outposts. Maritime traffic consisted mainly of small craft like the one in the picture and with the mountains in the background, it was an opportunity for a snapshot that only partly succeeds in capturing the breathtaking and awe-inspiring scenery always evident in the Chilean Fjords. Chilean Fjords

POSTSCRIPT: This picture was published in the Toronto Star Travel section, “Where In The World” on 23rd October, 2010. 

Chilean Fjords

25 November 2009.
Leaving the small town of Chacabuco in Southern Chile, we travelled the Chilean Fjords, navigating through a myriad of small islands, most of them sparsely inhabited, all part of the remote Magallanes. Islands had names like Desolacion (Desolation) and Ultima Esperanza (last Hope) that surely reflected the way the earliest settlers, many of them European, must have felt. Narrow channels bracketed by towering mountains partlyChilean Fjords explained the calm waters and isolated outposts. Maritime traffic consisted mainly of small craft like the one in the picture and with the mountains in the background, it was an opportunity for a snapshot that only partly succeeds in capturing the breathtaking and awe-inspiring scenery always evident in the Chilean Fjords.

POSTSCRIPT: This picture was published in the Toronto Star Travel section, “Where In The World” on 23rd October, 2010.