Art and Artists At Work

As of 2011, there were approximately 4.4 million artists in the world, with a thin line drawn between those that can be classified as Professional and those who are Recreational artists. The amount spent on art-related materials and services is approximately $4B every year with a projected 4% growth annually.

Professional artists create, on the average, 75 works of art annually while Recreational artists do 36 pieces.

“Art will remain the most astonishing activity of mankind born out of struggle between wisdom and madness, between dream and reality in our mind.” ~Magdalena Abakanowicz

These are some of the artists and art that I’ve encountered in my travels

[NOTE: ALL PHOTOGRAPHS ARE COPYRIGHT © KEN PUDDICOMBE. WRITTEN PERMISSION REQUIRED FOR USE OF THESE IMAGES.]

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Vancouver. BC Canada Waiting for inspiration

 

 

 

 

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St. Petersberg. RUSSIA. The Tsar lives on.

 

 


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Helsinki. FINLAND. A window to the world.

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Nassau. Bahamas. Art, one chip at a time.

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St.Petersberg. RUSSIA. Picasso Limbo?

 

 

 

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Santiago. CHILE. Art is what you see and what you make others see.

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Buenos Aires. ARGENTINA. Stepping up to do the hard work.

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Helsinki. FINLAND. Someone’s work cast in stone?

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St. Petersberg. RUSSIA. Picasso NOT for all ages?

 

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Sint Martin. Looking for someone inspiring.

Judith Gelberger -Author

 

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Judith Kopacsi Gelberger was born in February 1946, in Miskolc, Hungary, an industrial town located in the hilly North-East of the country. The family moved to Budapest in 1949 when her father, a police officer, was relocated to the country’s capital. For the first ten years of her life she was surrounded by people her parents and grandparents fought with in the anti-Nazi underground before and during World War II. She grew up on those stories, and it made her very proud to be a child of heroes. In 1952 her father became the Police Chief of Budapest, and she enjoyed all the privileges that came with his title. All this changed suddenly when on October 23rd, 1956 the university students took to the streets, supposedly to sympathize with the Polish workers. The peaceful demonstration soon turned into a bloody one. By then her father, totally disillusioned by the Soviet regime, sided with the revolution, and became one of its military leaders. The Soviet army crushed the revolution, and her father was arrested. He was sentenced to life imprisonment in a secret trial in 1958. His fate affected Judith drastically. Even getting a high school education proved to be a challenge. In 1965 she had a chance to leave Hungary and she came to Canada. It took her another ten years to get her parents to Canada. Judith is married and has had two wonderful children. Unfortunately their son, Leslie was killed in a boating accident in April 2017, leaving a wife and two small boys behind.

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