Portals To The World

Doors come in all shapes, sizes, colours, construction and styles. They can be single or double doors; French or Dutch doors; louvered or flush doors. There are barn doors and saloon doors; wicker doors and sliding doors; hinged doors and swing doors. There are even False doors that lead nowhere and don’t even open!

But the one aspect that they all have in common: they are meant to keep something or someone in or out.

The earliest known records of doors are those represented in the paintings of the Egyptian tombs and they were either single or double doors, each constructed with a single piece of wood. Over the centuries, apart from the security needs, the door has been recognized as the first aspect of your building that a visitor will encounter and it will thereby contribute to that vital first impression. They are essentially Portals to the occupant’s life and lifestyle.

These are some of the world’s doors that I’ve passed through…

 

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Siem Reap. Cambodia. An open door policy.

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Siem Reap. Cambodia. So many doors that lead to nowhere.

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Hue. Viet Nam. More than just a portal. It’s an artist’s canvas.

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Tunis. Tunisia. When one door is closed, another opens.

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Mumbai. India. The gateway the British Raj passed through.

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St. Thomas. USVirgin Islands. People from all over the world pass through.

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Dominican Republic. The way to the Lord.

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Cop Denmark
Tivoli Gardens. A busy thoroughfare

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Delhi. India. Who knows what lurks behind a closed door?

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Rostock Germany
People with glass doors shouldn’t throw bricks

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Estonia. A door within a portal going who knows where?

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St. Petersberg. Russia. It only takes a small key to open a big door?

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Stockholm Sweden
Carve its name with pride

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Varanasi India
The gateway to the holy city should look good.

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Bangkok. Thailand. Heed the writing on the door?

Children Of The World

Tomorrow’s citizens of the world. Innocent and still insulated from the ravages of time and the seven deadly sins, they will yet determine the future.

[NOTE: ALL PHOTOGRAPHS ARE COPYRIGHT © KEN PUDDICOMBE. WRITTEN PERMISSION REQUIRED FOR USE OF THESE IMAGES.]

 

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Agra. INDIA. The Age of Innocence.

 

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Native Village. PANAMA. “Look at me dad. I can balance.”

 

 

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Katmandu. NEPAL. Don’t Ask For Whom The Bell Tolls.

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Katmandu. NEPAL. “You can’t see it. But I take after my mum, who’s awesome.”

 

 

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Siem Reap. CAMBODIA. Taking the slow boat to somewhere.

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Ho Chi Minch City. VIETNAM. Dancing To a Different Beat.

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Katmandu. Nepal. “So, that’s how it’s done!”

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Varnasi. INDIA. “Can’t stop. Late for school.”

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DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. Sunshine on my shoulders.

VIET NAM 2009. HO CHI MINH CITY [SAIGON]

VIET NAM 2009. HO CHI MINH CITY [SAIGON]

All dressed up and going nowhere?
It’s understandable why Honda is the ubiquitous name for motorcycle. With a population of over 80 million, more than ten percent of the people ride the two-wheel transportation vehicle. There are 500,000 motorcycles in Hanoi alone, with double in Saigon and motorcycle usage is increasing annually, along with casualties at the rate of 300%.
I took these pictures from a bus and we were also going nowhere fast. I didn’t have to worry –we were on vacation. But what about the people who have to work for a living and rely on transportation to get there? Chaos can sometimes result, along with insane driving habits: riding on the wrong side of the road, making left turns from the right side of a lane, weaving, speeding, using high beams, inconsiderate passing and overloading. And the effect is a cacophonous, mind boggling, ear splitting medley of sounds that defy imagination.
Only 3% of riders use helmets, even though they are mandatory. Result? The most common accident fatality is due to a broken skull!